Friday, March 15, 2019

Mexico: Operativo Salim

Excerpts from Borderland Beat book - Chapter - Mexico: Operativo Salim



So here it was, possibly classified proof from the Mexican government themselves that perhaps the original story of an Islamic terrorist named Ahmed had indeed plotted bombings of the US embassy in Mexico City.

I spoke with Borderland Beat contributors Gerardo and Ovemex about the information we had obtained and we agreed to do further research with the full intent to go public on Borderland Beat. With their contribution, we went public, posting the information on Borderland Beat (BB) on October 13, 2011 under the title “Mexico: Operativo Salim” We also shared all the classified documents and suspect information we had obtained from Pedro.

“A couple of days ago we received information from an anonymous person telling us about information that this person wanted to share with us. Without giving it any thought we said sure.

We received some documents that appear to be official and did not appear to have been published anywhere else. One particular document that caught our attention was a Naval Ministry intelligence report stamped June 10, 2010. 

The Mexican classified documents leaked to me contained pictures and lists of objects found during a search warrant.

In addition to the above described document, we also received a copy of an official voter ID with the name of Arturo Hernandez Hernandez that appears to be the alleged Ahmed described in the document.

First and foremost, we want to make it clear that we have no way to confirm the validity of these documents, but we present it for the content it represents, readers must form their own conclusion as to the validity of such document.

However, other documents stamped Confidential Naval Ministry that were received from the anonymous source were shown to a member of Mexico's security establishment who confirmed their validity."


(The book provides further detail of the documents and further backlash from the outcome of the post on BB)
Needless to say, this post in Borderland Beat blog went viral in Mexico and started to make the rounds in main stream media in Mexico. Televisa had Millennuim news anchor Joaquin Lopez Doriga reported on television that the US government had actually leaked the information of "Operation Salim" and that it was confirmed to be false by the Mexican authorities. He failed to tell the truth, that in fact it had been exposed by Borderland Beat and the classified documents had been received by an anonymous person named Pedro as documented in the Borderland Beat Blog.

This was all over Mexico, making national news, being talked in social media and I am sure it got someone’s attention here in the U.S. from the federal government. I was an active law enforcement officer with the City of Albuquerque, and I started to think that perhaps I should let my chain of command know what was going on. I had confided much of the information to my associate and close friend, although he did not have much interest in the matter.

I decided to let my immediate supervisor  know that an unknown source had been sending me Mexican classified information about cartel activity.

He had no clue how to handle my disclosure. He was merely an online supervisor who spent all his time in the field dealing with police matters at the lowest level possible. What do you do when your subordinate discloses to you that he is involved with sensitive classified information from Mexico that is all over the Mexican news? And even though I was anonymous, people in the right places could very easily figure it out? All this sounded like some spy novel, and way beyond his level of expertise and rank.

Another question popped up, is it even legal?

And the third:

“Fuck dude, do I even know you?” was all he could say about the matter when I told him about it.



The post became a news topic in talk show Noticias MVS with radio talk host Caremn Aristegui and Washington DC reporter Dolia Estevez.

 Noticias MVS


 Noticias MVS


 Noticias MVS

   Noticias MVS

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